Feb 21st 2019

PANEL: Phil Enquist & MARTIN MOELLER

Mon., March 4
2:00 p.m. | S. R. Crown Hall, Lower Core



PHIL ENQUIST
"Oak Ridge City Center 2030 Strategy Plan"

The plan explores ways to accommodate a new generation of housing by proposing a vibrant, walkable urban district that offers a mix of cultural, recreational, and commercial venues to attract the next generation of Oak Ridgers.




MARTIN MOELLER
"Secret Cities: The Architecture and Planning of the Manhattan Project"

"Secret Cities" is an exhibition that examines the innovative design and construction of Oak Ridge, Hanford, and Los Alamos, tracing their precedents in the Bauhaus and other early modern schools of architectural thought.



Following the presentations,
 a Q&A panel discussion will be moderated by Director of the Master of Architecture Program and Associate Professor, Martin Felsen.


Phil Enquist, FAIA, is Consulting Partner, Urban Design and Planning at SOM. Enquist plays a key leadership role in SOM's Global City Design Practice, one of the world’s most awarded urban planning groups. Enquist and his studios have improved the quality and efficiency of city living on five continents by creating location-specific strategic designs that integrate nature and urban density within a framework of future-focused public infrastructure.

Martin Moeller is Senior Curator at the National Building Museum, as well as an independent curator, writer, and editor. He previously served as the Museum’s Executive Vice President (chief operating officer), overseeing all exhibitions, education programs, development, and operations. He stepped down from this role in 2001 in order to have more time to pursue independent projects.

Aerial View Of Hanford Construction Camp

"Secret Cities" is an exhibition that examines the innovative design and construction of Oak Ridge, Hanford, and Los Alamos, tracing their precedents in the Bauhaus and other early modern schools of architectural thought. It looks at daily life within the cities and how it was shaped by their physical form, illuminating the social stratification and segregation that were still evident in these cities despite the high-minded principles underlying their design.

The exhibition addresses each city’s development since the conclusion of the Manhattan Project, and their continuing importance as centers of research and technology, now largely devoted to non-military purposes. Read more here.